NOAA's Marine Debris Blog

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Fishing for Energy Surpasses 300,000 lb Derelict Fishing Gear Milestone

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On Monday, partners in the Fishing for Energy initiative, including the NOAA Marine Debris Program, gathered at Covanta Energy-from-Waste facility in Haverhill, MA to celebrate a significant milestone: the facility has turned more than 300,000 pounds of derelict fishing gear into renewable electricity.
NOAA Marine Debris Program Director Nancy Wallace stands  in front of thousands of pounds of fishing gear that will soon be converted into renewable energy.

NOAA Marine Debris Program Director Nancy Wallace stands in front of thousands of pounds of fishing gear that will soon be converted into renewable energy.

Fishing for Energy is an innovative public-private partnership that provides commercial fisherman a cost-free way to recycle old and unusable fishing gear. Schnitzer Steel collects the gear and recycles any metal, and then transports the remaining gear to Covanta facilities, where it is converted into energy. Since launching in 2008, Fishing for Energy has processed more than 2.2 million pounds of old fishing gear from 41 ports across the nation, a portion of which has been retrieved directly from the ocean by fishers.

Author: NOAA Marine Debris Program

The NOAA Marine Debris Program envisions the global ocean and its coasts, users, and inhabitants free from the impacts of marine debris. Our mission is to investigate and solve the problems that stem from marine debris, in order to protect and conserve our nation's marine environment, natural resources, industries, economy, and people.

2 thoughts on “Fishing for Energy Surpasses 300,000 lb Derelict Fishing Gear Milestone

  1. Pingback: Fishing for Energy Surpasses 300,000 lb Derelict Fishing Gear ... - sportBlogs

  2. Pingback: Fishing for Energy Surpasses 300,000 lb Derelict Fishing Gear Milestone | Environmental News Bits

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