NOAA's Marine Debris Blog

Keepin' the Sea Free of Debris!

Celebrating Earth Day – Coast to Coast

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By: Asma Mahdi

Earth Day celebrations are in full-swing today, and this Earth Month volunteers have been diving deep into tons, literally tons, of spring cleaning for our planet.

The NOAA Marine Debris Program staff kicked off Earth Day activities participating in the 26th Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup and the 25th Annual Anacostia Watershed Society Earth Day Cleanup, in Washington DC, concentrating our efforts throughout watershed. With more than 300 cleanup sites, volunteers dug deep to remove debris and prevent litter from reaching shorelines. The cleanups attracted more than 5,000 volunteers that helped remove more than 100 tons of debris, which included everything from cracked bowling balls to piles of tires.

Cleanups continued throughout the month of April. In Washington state, thousands of volunteers participated in the annual Washington Coast Cleanup, a state-wide tradition featuring  a series of cleanups to remove marine debris. At the Lake Ozette cleanup site, more than 100 CoastSavers volunteers helped remove litter from Washington’s outer coast, which often exhibits rugged terrain. And, in Massachusetts, the Gloucester community, including Maritime Gloucester and the Rozalia Project, organized cleanup efforts at Gloucester Harbor with more than 70 volunteers. Items, such as , foam floats, wooden boards, and a tire, were amongst several hundred pounds of debris removed.

It is great to see communities come together in this effort across our planet to keep Earth and our oceans clean. Thank you to all the dedicated volunteers that have helped clean up local beaches and waterways to leave behind a cleaner more healthy coastline this Earth Month!

Here’s a closer peak at these Earth Day efforts:

 

Author: NOAA Marine Debris Program

The NOAA Marine Debris Program envisions the global ocean and its coasts, users, and inhabitants free from the impacts of marine debris. Our mission is to investigate and solve the problems that stem from marine debris, in order to protect and conserve our nation's marine environment, natural resources, industries, economy, and people.

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